It is looking like Alzheimer’s is another potential side effect of a sugary, Western-style diet.

A study about the affects of a sugary diet and cognitive decline was published in the journal of Diabetologia.  It found that people with high blood sugar had a faster rate of cognitive decline than those with normal blood sugar.

Dementia is currently not curable, so it is very important to study the risk factors.

Another study conducted by Melissa Schilling, a professor at New York University, connecting diabetes to Alzheimer’s in 2016. She  found that people who have type 2 diabetes are about twice as likely to get Alzheimer’s, and people who have diabetes and are treated with insulin are also more likely to get Alzheimer’s, suggesting elevated insulin plays a role in Alzheimer’s.

Diabetes can also weaken the blood vessels, which increases the likelihood that you’ll have ministrokes in the brain, causing various forms of dementia. A high intake of simple sugars can make cells, including those in the brain, insulin resistant, which could cause the brain cells to die. Meanwhile, eating too much in general can cause obesity.

“Alzheimer’s is like a slow-burning fire that you don’t see when it starts,” Schilling said. It takes time for clumps to form and for cognition to begin to deteriorate. “By the time you see the signs, it’s way too late to put out the fire.”           

It is important to monitor your diet and stay active to live a fully beneficial healthy lifestyle.  Not only does eating healthy and working out keep you fit, it also keeps your mind healthy as you age.  Having health insurance will also contribute to you living longer.  Preventative healthcare is one of the many benefits of having health insurance.  Taking advantage of your health insurance will keep you informed on your health and how to keep yourself healthy longer.

Contact Cosmo Insurance to sign up for health insurance that is right for you.

GET A QUOTE

 

source: https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/08/13/sugar-alzheimers-disease-link.aspx

 

Share |


No Comments


Post a Comment
Name
Required
E-Mail
Required (Not Displayed)
Comment
Required


All comments are moderated and stripped of HTML.
Submission Validation
Required
CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Enter the Validation Code from above.
NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive