According to Stanford Children’s Health, almost 90% of newborns “show some form of hand sucking by two hours after birth.” It’s a natural reflex for young kids and can even help them feel safe or handle stress. Yet oral health issues can arise once teeth begin to form and protrude from the gums.

Prolonged thumb sucking can lead to a mouth–or jaw–full of problems down the road, and there aren’t always easy ways to stop thumb sucking.

Why is sucking on a thumb an issue?

The innocent behavior becomes an issue because of the constant pressure pushing on the jaw, mouth, and gums. This can change the way their mouths develop. It can influence the formation of the palate and the alignment of teeth. Sucking can cause oral health problems like an overbite. This can lead to issues pronouncing certain words, and the thumb itself may even become sore or infected.

 

As your child grows older and begins exploring the world more, they are exposed to more germs. Germs on the hands quickly become germs in the mouth when thumb sucking is a regular occurrence.

When does thumb sucking become an issue?

What was once a natural habit starts to become a problem as your child passes the age of four. Many children naturally abandon thumb sucking behavior by this point in life. Some may need encouragement to stop before the routine causes problems. Because each kid is different, it’s important to pay attention to changes in the mouth and the frequency of the thumb-sucking habit.

What are some easy ways to stop thumb sucking?

·       Build positive habits — Just like how potty training involves shifting from diapers to the toilet, thumb sucking should be slowly weaned out. This means using positive reinforcement, praise, and setting clear expectations. Don’t be afraid to make it fun or develop a rewards-based system—this also works for brushing teeth—that encourages the absence of thumb sucking.

·       Don’t go cold turkey — Learning is a process, and it’s important for your child to learn how to stop a harmful behavior. Limit the amount of time that you allow your child to suck his or her thumb, progressively reducing the time until it’s done. If you must, restrict thumb sucking to specific times or places, like at home and not in public.

·       Work together — Help your child be aware of thumb sucking and drive the desire to want to change it. Many kids do it unconsciously. Help them create a path to success. There’s no need for thumb guards or nasty-tasting topical stuff if you can foster a positive learning experience.

·       Eliminate stress — Remember, sucking one’s thumb is also a coping technique that helps children feel calm and comfortable. Recurrence of the behavior or an inability to make progress could be an indication of stressors. Work to identify and reduce or eliminate any such triggers.

·       Talk to your dentist — The people trained to take care of your oral health will certainly have ides and suggestions on how to curb thumb-sucking tendencies.

Keep in mind that your child is his or her own person. They will grow out of the need for thumb sucking when they’re ready and not a minute sooner. As a parent, they’ll need your help to identify when it’s time to let go of certain behaviors and develop others.

 

Cosmo Insurance Agency is an independent insurance agency serving surrounding communities in New Jersey. Cosmo keeps its promise to assure an efficient and creative approach to the services we offer. Each of our clients experience a personalized and long-term relationship with us. Our New Jersey based team of health brokers guides our clients in helping them choose the most cost-effective options. By incorporating the latest in technology-based tools and laws on healthcare, employee benefits, life insurance and finance, we keep our clients up-to-date with the plans that encompass all of their needs, whether it is individual or group insurance. 

CONTACT COSMO

GET A DENTAL INSURANCE QUOTE

Source: https://www.deltadentalnj.com/blog/entry/2019/how-to-stop-thumb-sucking

Posted 10:00 AM

Share |


No Comments


Post a Comment
Name
Required
E-Mail
Required (Not Displayed)
Comment
Required


All comments are moderated and stripped of HTML.
Submission Validation
Required
CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Enter the Validation Code from above.
NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive
  • 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015


View Mobile Version
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Blog
Google+
© Copyright. All rights reserved.
Powered by Insurance Website Builder